Science News Feature

Do you find it difficult to moderate your internet usage? Internet addiction (IA) is an international phenomenon but estimations of its prevalence are widely variant. In a new study in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, an international meta-analysis is presented which suggests that prevalence of IA varies considerably between countries and is inversely related to quality of life. The article is available free on...

Some cars look friendly, others mean or even sexy. The human tendency to anthropomorphise, give human characteristics, facial or otherwise to objects, is part of the reason movies like “Cars” by Disney-Pixar, and countless other characters, based on inanimate objects, are enjoyed by humans. To better understand what happens in the brain when we anthropomorphise, a team of researchers set out to find the brain region activated when...

The search for a vaccine against HIV has been frustrated by difficulties in generating a sufficient neutralising antibody response in humans to vaccine candidates. However, progress is being made by various innovative approaches including use of the unusual model animal, the llama. A new study in the journal PLOS Pathogens shows that immunised llamas produce a combination of neutralising antibodies that together destroy all members of a panel...

Glycemic index relates to how much a food raises blood sugar levels. Foods with similar carbohydrate content can have very different glycemic indices and it is suggested that this may impact on risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, a new study published in JAMA suggests that selecting foods with similar carbohydrate content but lower glycemic index has no positive impact on risk factors such as insulin sensitivity,...

The immune response to gluten in wheat and related cereals in celiac disease is well established but whether other cereal components also induce an immune response is less well understood. A new paper published online in the Journal of Proteome Research suggests that non-gluten proteins in wheat do trigger an immune reaction and could potentially contribute to celiac disease.