Science News Feature

You might resemble or act more like your mother, but a novel research study from UNC School of Medicine researchers reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads. Specifically, the research shows that although we inherit equal amounts of genetic mutations from our parents – the mutations that make us who we are instead of some other person – we actually “use” more of the DNA that we inherit from our dads....

The FIT Treadmill Score, a newly developed algorithm that can be simply calculated from standard exercise tests, is highly predictive of survival over ten years. This is according to a study published today in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, led by senior author Dr Michael Blaha of the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease. The concept that physical fitness reduces mortality risk over time is not new but...

About 99 percent of human genes are shared with chimpanzees. Only the small remainder sets us apart. However, we have one important difference: The brain of humans is three times as big as the chimpanzee brain. During evolution our genome must have changed in order to trigger such brain growth. Wieland Huttner, Director and Research Group Leader a the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG), and his team...

A new study on the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system, which has long been known to dampen physical pain, suggests that this system is in fact also associated with dampening the pain associated with social rejection. Furthermore, the response of this system is less robust in people with major depressive disorder compared to healthy control individuals. The study is published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry and comes from a research team...

A new study using DNA from a submerged site reveals evidence of ancient wheat, some 8000 years ago, in British Isles. The start of 'civilization' has been linked with the beginnings of farming as the hunter-gatherer life-style began to slowly wane.  However, determination of precisely when this change happened not only varies geographically but also has been difficult to elucidate.

Other Exclusive Science News

Ziba Kashef

Yale researchers developed a controlled-release oral therapy that reversed type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats, according to a study published on Feb. 26 by Science. Existing therapies for type 2 diabetes, and the closely associated conditions of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (...

Marie-Therese Walsh PhD

A simple manufacturing process involving use of disposable equipment to produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) from minipools of plasma donations is described today in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. IgG is on the WHO Essential Medicines List but it is currently manufactured in...

Laura A. Andersson PhD

Dragonflies, with their amazingly diverse colors and tetrad of sheer wings, are in the order anisoptera; they are also very ancient, with some fossils dating back to the late Jurassic period. Dragonflies have large multi-facted eyes and color vision. Surprisingly, in contrast to the three (red,...

Marie-Therese Walsh PhD

We have probably all experienced the sense of a negative emotional event in our past feeling like it happened ‘only yesterday’.  A new study in the journal PLoS One has now shown that ruminating over past events that made us feel angry or guilty make those events feel closer in...

Breaking Science News from Other Sources

Science News Desk Mon, 03/02/2015

What do a human colon, septic tank, copper nanoparticles and zebrafish have in common? They were the key components used by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and UCLA to study the impact copper nanoparticles, which are found in everything from paint to cosmetics, have on...

Science News Desk Mon, 03/02/2015

Neuroscientists generally think of the front end of the human visual system as a simple light detection system: The patterns produced when light falls on the retina are relayed to the visual cortex at the rear of the brain, where all of the “magic” happens that transforms these...

Science News Desk Mon, 03/02/2015

Damage to myelin, the fatty insulator that enables communication between nerve cells, characterizes multiple sclerosis (MS) and other devastating neurological diseases. The damage doesn’t come all at once: There is a “honeymoon” period during which some regeneration of myelin,...

Science News Desk Mon, 03/02/2015

Tiny parasitic hookworms infect nearly half a billion people worldwide—almost exclusively in developing countries—causing health problems ranging from gastrointestinal issues to cognitive impairment and stunted growth in children. By sequencing and analyzing the genome of one...

Science News Desk Mon, 03/02/2015

An immune system that helps bacteria combat viruses is yielding unlikely results such as the ability to edit genome sequences and potentially correct mutations that cause human disease. University of Georgia researchers Michael and Rebecca Terns were among the first to begin to study the...