Science News Feature

While you may feel like you get the flu every winter, in reality if you are over the age of thirty it is likely that you catch the flu only about twice each decade. This is one finding of a study published today in the journal PLOS Biology. In the study, a multi-national research team based in the United Kingdom, United States and China focused on the long-lived antibody response to influenza A virus over the lifetime of an individual.

Everyone worries about losing their memory as they grow older—memory loss remains one of the most common complaints of the elderly. But the molecular reasons behind the processes remain unclear, particularly those associated with advancing age. The new study, published recently in The Journal of Neuroscience, describes in detail the loss of connectivity between two sets of neurons that prevents the formation of long-term memory.

You might resemble or act more like your mother, but a novel research study from UNC School of Medicine researchers reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads. Specifically, the research shows that although we inherit equal amounts of genetic mutations from our parents – the mutations that make us who we are instead of some other person – we actually “use” more of the DNA that we inherit from our dads....

The FIT Treadmill Score, a newly developed algorithm that can be simply calculated from standard exercise tests, is highly predictive of survival over ten years. This is according to a study published today in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, led by senior author Dr Michael Blaha of the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease. The concept that physical fitness reduces mortality risk over time is not new but...

About 99 percent of human genes are shared with chimpanzees. Only the small remainder sets us apart. However, we have one important difference: The brain of humans is three times as big as the chimpanzee brain. During evolution our genome must have changed in order to trigger such brain growth. Wieland Huttner, Director and Research Group Leader a the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG), and his team...

Other Exclusive Science News

Marie-Therese Walsh PhD

A new study on the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system, which has long been known to dampen physical pain, suggests that this system is in fact also associated with dampening the pain associated with social rejection. Furthermore, the response of this system is less robust in people with major...

Laura A. Andersson PhD

A new study using DNA from a submerged site reveals evidence of ancient wheat, some 8000 years ago, in British Isles. The start of 'civilization' has been linked with the beginnings of farming as the hunter-gatherer life-style began to slowly wane.  However, determination of...

Ziba Kashef

Yale researchers developed a controlled-release oral therapy that reversed type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in rats, according to a study published on Feb. 26 by Science. Existing therapies for type 2 diabetes, and the closely associated conditions of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (...

Marie-Therese Walsh PhD

A simple manufacturing process involving use of disposable equipment to produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) from minipools of plasma donations is described today in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. IgG is on the WHO Essential Medicines List but it is currently manufactured in...

Breaking Science News from Other Sources

Science News Desk Tue, 03/03/2015

UCLA life scientists have created an accurate new method to identify genetic markers for many diseases -- a significant step toward a new era of personalized medicine, tailored to each person's DNA and RNA. The powerful method, called GIREMI (pronounced Gir-REMY), will help scientists to...

Science News Desk Tue, 03/03/2015

If you’ve ever wondered why you aren’t a little taller, it turns out it’s not all about genetics. In findings published in the Journal of Pediatrics (January 2015), an Israeli research team shows that the environment in which one lives from the womb to about age one largely...

Science News Desk Tue, 03/03/2015

Gastric bypass and similar stomach-shrinking surgeries are a popular option for obese patients looking to lose weight or treat type 2 diabetes. While the surgeries have been linked to a decreased risk in many types of cancers, the single outlier in a 2013 long-term study of 77,000 obese patients...

Science News Desk Tue, 03/03/2015

Most people consume more salt than they need and therefore have a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, which are the two leading causes of death worldwide. But a study published by Cell Press March 3rd in Cell Metabolism reveals that dietary salt could have a biological advantage: defending...

Science News Desk Tue, 03/03/2015

Two of the four known groups of human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 groups O and P) have originated in western lowland gorillas, according to an international team of scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Montpellier, the University of...