Science News Feature

Computer simulation has gained popularity in teaching human anatomy and there is an ongoing debate on whether it is necessary to continue use of human cadavers for anatomy instruction. However, the results of a new study in the journal Anatomical Sciences Education suggests that anatomy students perform better on tests if they have been instructed on cadavers rather than purely on a multimedia learning system.

 

A new study found that curcumin can restore expression of an adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, which in turn suppressed cancer cell metastasis. This effect was shown to be due to Beta-catenin/Slug pathway activation by curcumin in cancer cells.

 

For epileptic patients who require surgery the procedure involved is an invasive and dangerous one involving drilling into the skull to access the hippocampus, which is the brain area where seizures originate. However, a collaborative study involving mechanical engineers and neurosurgeons at Vanderbilt University may open the way for minimally invasive surgical options in the near future. The working prototype, which would allow access...

Interest in science among students is a strong predictor of science achievement, but only in wealthier countries with a high GDP. This is the major finding of a new study in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study suggests that not only socioeconomic status at the level of the home and school environment but also overall national wealth impacts significantly on the opportunities of...

Melanoma is an unusually aggressive cancer which spreads or metastasizes very quickly early in the tumor development. The driver of this spread away from the primary tumor has not been well understood. Now results of a new study have shown that melanoma cells follow a ‘breadcrumb trail’ of a fatty serum component called lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The cells break LPA down as they go, creating a gradient of low LPA in the...