Science News Feature

Researchers studying cancer and other invasive diseases rely on high-resolution imaging to see tumors and other activity deep within the body’s tissues. Using a new high-speed, high-resolution imaging method, Lihong Wang, PhD, and his team at Washington University in St. Louis were able to see blood flow, blood oxygenation, oxygen metabolism and other functions inside a living mouse brain at faster rates than ever before.

Scientists have developed tiny ‘nanoneedles’ that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice. The researchers, from Imperial College London and Houston Methodist Research Institute in the USA, hope their nanoneedle technique could ultimately help damaged organs and nerves to repair themselves and help transplanted organs to thrive. 

Parents of overweight and obese children may have difficulty identifying that their child is overweight unless their body mass index (BMI) lies at the very extreme end of the official classification scales. This is the main finding of a new study in the British Journal of General Practice from a team of researchers in different institutions in the United Kingdom, led by London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and UCL Institute of...

Preliminary study in lab-grown cells raises possibility of cancer diagnosis without biopsies. Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumors, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn’t cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a Johns Hopkins study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting telltale sugar molecules...

Scientists say our brains may not be as complicated as we once thought – and they’re using sea slugs to prove it. Led by graduate student Angela Bruno, researchers at The University of Manchester and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in Chicago mapped how neurons fired in the brain of the large sea slug Aplysia while it moved. “What happens in the brain during movement is currently only well understood for...

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Marie-Therese Walsh PhD

Young adolescents are more swayed by the opinions of their peers on how risky a situation is while adults, older adolescents and younger children are more influenced by the views of other adults. These are the findings of a new study from a research team in University College London, published...

Science News Desk

Say you’re out shopping for basic household goods — perhaps orange juice and soup. Or light bulbs. Or diapers for your young child. How do you choose the products you buy? Is it a complicated decision, or a simple one?

Marie-Therese Walsh PhD

Colonisation of the upper airways with a harmless bacteria called Neisseria lactamica reduces both pre-existing and newly acquired infection with meningococcal disease-causing Neisseria meningitides. This is the major finding of a new study on university students, a group at high risk of this...

Science News Desk

Shakespeare said "to be or not to be" is the question, and now scientists are asking how life forms grow to be the correct size with proportional body parts. Probing deeply into genetics and biology at the earliest moments of embryonic development, researchers at Cincinnati Children...

Breaking Science News from Other Sources

Science News Desk Mon, 03/30/2015

The decades worth of data that has been collected about the billions of neurons in the brain is astounding. To help scientists make sense of this “brain big data,” researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used data mining to create...

Science News Desk Mon, 03/30/2015

Cholesterol-lowering statins have transformed the treatment of heart disease. But while the decision to use the drugs in patients with a history of heart attacks and strokes is mostly clear-cut, that choice can be a far trickier proposition for the tens of millions of Americans with high...

Science News Desk Mon, 03/30/2015

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease receiving home oxygen have a higher risk of burn injury. This study was published on March 30 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Science News Desk Mon, 03/30/2015

A tiny bit of silver, combined with water and air, can convert aldehydes into acids efficiently -- instead of the classical methods using stoichiometric amounts of expensive or toxic metal oxidants, according to a new study by McGill University researchers.

Science News Desk Mon, 03/30/2015

Tel Aviv University researchers develop molecular backbone of super-slim, bendable digital displays. From smartphones and tablets to computer monitors and interactive TV screens, electronic displays are everywhere. As the demand for instant, constant communication grows, so too does the urgency...